Paul Krugman: "Bitcoin retrasa el sistema monetario por ...

A good article from Paul Krugman...will he change his mind on Bitcoin in a few years?

submitted by xiphy to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Hitler Hunt for 7/16/2019

I found 135 Hitlers in Politics today.

As backlash against Trump’s ‘go back’ comments builds, here’s Ronald Reagan’s ‘love letter to immigrants’: ‘You can go to live in Germany, Turkey or Japan, but you cannot become German, Turk or Japanese. But anyone, from any corner of the Earth, can come to live in America and become an American.’
RacistGOP trends on Twitter as Republicans stay silent on Donald Trump's racist attack
Rep. Al Green says he will file articles of impeachment against Trump tonight, despite pushback from Democratic leaders
Melania Trump remains silent on husband's racist tweets despite having been a US citizen for shorter time than Ilhan Omar
Kellyanne Conway Snaps Back at Reporter: ‘What’s Your Ethnicity?’
Ivanka Trump, Jared Kushner And Every Trump Administration Official Accused Of Using Personal Email For Work
When Does America Reckon with the Gravity of Donald Trump's Alleged Rapes?
Twitter Users Slam Mitt Romney’s ‘Spineless’ Reaction To Racist Trump Tweets — The Utah senator refused to answer a reporter’s question on if he thought the president was racist.
'Good,' Says Elizabeth Warren, After Billionaire Right-Winger Peter Thiel Says She's 2020 Democrat He Is 'Most Scared By'
Trump’s Racism Is Not Blundering -- It Is Tactically Deliberate - Trump's racism is not an oops, it's a fascist strategy.
William Barr steps in to make sure the NYPD cop who killed Eric Garner won’t be prosecuted
Federal judge permanently blocks Trump admin from adding citizenship question to 2020 census
Donald Trump has made it clear: the only 'real Americans' are white and Christian
ObamaWasBetterAt trends after Trump Attacks on Minority Congresswomen
GOP advisers reportedly told Trump his racist attacks on Democratic congresswomen may have backfired
President angrily attacks victims of his racist tweets for third day in a row, as impeachment calls grow
Trump supporters stand by the president amid inflammatory tweets: "That's why I voted for him"
Oregon to require schools to teach about Holocaust
Pelosi is forcing House Republicans to go on the record on Trump’s ‘go back’ tweets
New Hampshire county commissioner quits GOP because of Trump
Trump Is Now Calling “The Squad” “Pro Terrorist” In Yet Another Racist Tweet
Trump says he will 'take a look' at investigating Google for treason.
Mayor Kenney: ‘If Donald Trump Ever Has To Go Back Where He Came From, He’s Going To Have To Go To Hell’
‘Nobody Opened the Door’: Neighbors Rally During an ICE Raid in Houston
House Condemns Trump’s Attack on Four Congresswomen as Racist
Jewish Protestors form human chain around ICE Headquarters saying “Never Again is Now”
'Unfit to be president': Full text of House impeachment resolution on Trump
‘Really Good Speller’ Trump’s Handwritten Note Shows Embarrassing Mistakes
Conway To Reporter Who Asked About Trump’s Racist Tweets: ‘What’s Your Ethnicity?’
Ilhan Omar to Maddow: Trump Is ‘Corrupt,’ ‘Inept,’ and the ‘Worst President We’ve Had’
Chris Evans Exposes ‘Painfully Transparent’ Reason For Trump’s Racist Attack
Donald Trump is like a 20th-century fascist, says Sadiq Khan
Trump’s notes show he doesn’t have a clue how to spell Al Qaeda
House GOP Leaders Claim Trump Tweets Not Racist Because We Are ‘Party Of Lincoln’
If You Helped a Racist Become the Most Powerful Person in America, Then You’re a Racist Too
Kellyanne Conway to reporter: What's your ethnicity?
Kris Kobach: I Might Still Support Trump if He Came Out and Said ‘I’m a Racist’
Anti-Defamation League blasts Trump for 'invoking support for Israel to defend this racism'
Kellyanne Conway just said something that should stun you
Trump is an apocalypse
As Hate Incidents Grow, More States Require Schools To Teach The Holocaust
Trump vs. 'the Squad' makes watershed moment in racial politics
Children in states with strict gun laws are less likely to die, according to a new study
Treasury secretary says he doesn't find Trump's tweets racist
Trump repeats racist attack, says Democratic congresswomen ‘can leave’ the US
Puerto Rico’s governor needs to step down
Trump: I don't have a racist bone in my body
‘Trump’s Going to Get Re-elected, Isn’t He?’ Voters have reason to worry.
There’s One Heresy That Sets Bernie Apart From All Other Dem Contenders to Unseat Trump
Trump Faces Backlash from Base over Bitcoin
Watch: Ilhan Omar declines to respond to Trump claiming she supports al Qaeda
Moderate Dem slams 'squad' for threatening to primary him: 'They're not Democrats ... they're socialists'
Sieg Heil! I mean... Beep Boop, I am a robot.
My purpose is to find and link comments in Politics that contain the word 'Hitler'
Since my birth, I have found a total of 43614 Hitlers in Politics. On average, I found 79 Hitlers per day.
Today, I read 54953 comments. In total, I have read 24333224 comments.
submitted by HitlerFallacyBot to TheHitlerFallacy [link] [comments]

To detect fake news, this AI first learned to write it

One of the biggest problems in media today is so-called “fake news,” which is so highly pernicious in part because it superficially resembles the real thing. AI tools promise to help identify it, but in order for it to do so, researchers have found that the best way is for that AI to learn to create fake news itself — a double-edged sword, though perhaps not as dangerous as it sounds.
_Grover_is a new system created by the University of Washington and Allen Institute for AI (AI2) computer scientists that is extremely adept at writing convincing fake news on myriad topics and as many styles — and as a direct consequence is also no slouch at spotting it. The paper describing the model is available here.
The idea of a fake news generator isn’t new — in fact, OpenAI made a splash recently by announcing that its own text-generating AI was too dangerous to release publicly. But Grover’s creators believe we’ll only get better at fighting generated fake news by putting the tools to create it out there to be studied.
OpenAI built a text generator so good, it’s considered too dangerous to release
“These models are not capable, we think right now, of inflicting serious harm. Maybe in a few years they will be, but not yet,” the lead on the project, Rowan Zeller, told me. “I don’t think it’s too dangerous to release — really, we _need_to release it, specifically to researchers who are studying this problem, so we can build better defenses. We need all these communities, security, machine learning, natural language processing, to talk to each other — we can’t just hide the model, or delete it and pretend it never happened.”
Therefore and to that end, you can try Grover yourself right here. (Though you might want to read the rest of this article first so you know what’s going on.)

Voracious reader

The AI was created by having it ingest an enormous corpus of real news articles, a dataset called RealNews that is being introduced alongside Grover. The 120-gigabyte library contains articles from the end of 2016 through March of this year, from the top 5,000 publications tracked by Google News.
By studying the style and content of millions of real news articles, Grover builds a complex model of how certain phrases or styles are used, what topics and features follow one another in an article, how they’re associated with different outlets, ideas, and so on.
This is done using an “adversarial” system, wherein one aspect of the model generates content and another rates how convincing it is — if it doesn’t meet a threshold, the generator tries again, and eventually it learns what is convincing and what isn’t. Adversarial setups are a powerful force in AI research right now, often being used to create photorealistic imagery from scratch.
Mona Lisa frown: Machine learning brings old paintings and photos to life
It isn’t just spitting out random articles, either. Grover is highly parameterized, meaning its output is highly dependent on input. So if you tell it to create a fake article about a study linking vaccines and autism spectrum disorders, you are also free to specify that the article should seem as if it appeared on CNN, Fox News, or even TechCrunch.
I generated a few articles, which I’ve pasted at the bottom of this one, but here’s the first bit of an example:
Serial entrepreneur Dennis Mangler raises 6M to create blockchain-based drone delivery
May 29, 2019 – Devin Coldewarg
Drone delivery — not so new, and that raises a host of questions: How reliable is the technology? Will service and interference issues flare up?
Drone technology is changing a lot, but its most obvious use — package delivery — has never been perfected on a large scale, much less by a third party. But perhaps that is about to change.
Serial entrepreneur Dennis Mangler has amassed an impressive — by the cybernetic standards of this short-lived and crazy industry — constellation of companies ranging from a top-tier Korean VC to a wholly owned subsidiary of Amazon, ranging from a functional drone repair shop to a developer of commercial drone fleets.
But while his last company (Amazon’s Prime Air) folded, he has decided to try his hand at delivery by drone again with Tripperell, a San Francisco-based venture that makes sense of the cryptocurrency token space to create a bridge from blockchain to delivery.
The system they’re building is sound — as described in a new Medium post, it will first use Yaman Yasmine’s current simple crowdsourced drone repair platform, SAA, to create a drone organization that taps into a mix of overseas networks and domestic industry.
From there the founders will form Tripperell, with commercialized drones running on their own smart contracts to make deliveries.
Not bad considering it only took about ten seconds to appear after I gave it the date, domain, my name (ish), and the headline. (I’d probably tweak that lede, but if you think about it, it does sort of make sense.)
Note that it doesn’t actually know who I am, or what TechCrunch is. But it associates certain data with other data. For instance, one example the team offered was an editorial “in the style of,” to co-opt cover bands’ lingo, Paul Krugman’s New York Times editorials.
I don’t think it’s too dangerous to release — really, we need to release it. “There’s nothing hard coded — we haven’t told the model who Paul Krugman is. But it learns from reading a lot,” Zeller told me. The system is just trying to make sure that the generated article is sufficiently like the other data it associates with that domain and author. “And it’s going to learn things like, ‘Paul Krugman’ tends to talk about ‘economics,’ without us telling it that he’s an economist.” It’s hard to say how much it will attempt to affect a given author’s style — that may or may not be something it “noticed,” and AI models are notoriously opaque to analysis. Its style aping goes beyond the author; it even went so far as creating the inter-paragraph “Read more” links in a “Fox News” article I generated.
But this facility in creating articles rests on the ability to tell when an article is not convincing — that’s the “discriminator” that evaluates whether the output of the “generator” is any good. So what happens if you feed the discriminator other stuff? Turns out it’s better than any other AI system right now, at least within the limits of the tasks they tested it on, at determining what’s fake and what’s real.
Fabula AI is using social spread to spot ‘fake news’

Natural language limitations

Naturally Grover is best at detecting its own fake articles, since in a way the agent knows its own processes. But it can also detect those made by other models, such as OpenAI’s GPT2, with high accuracy. This is because current text-generation systems share certain weaknesses, and with a few examples those weaknesses become even more obvious to the discriminator.
“These models have to make one of two bad choices. The first bad option is you just trust the model,” Zeller said. In this case, you get a sort of error-compounding issue where a single bad choice, which is inevitable given the number of choices it has to make, leads to another bad one, and another, and so on; “Without supervision they often just go off the rails.”
“The other choice is to play it a bit safer,” Zeller explained, citing OpenAI’s decision to have the generator create dozens of options and pick the most likely one. This conservative approach avoids unlikely word combinations or phrases — but as Zeller points out, “human speech is a mix of high probability and low probability words. If I knew what you were going to tell me, you wouldn’t be speaking. So there have to be some things that are hard to anticipate.”
These and other habits in text generation algorithms make it possible for Grover to identify generated articles with 92 percent accuracy.
And no, you’re very clever, but you can’t just take the ones it doesn’t detect and sort of breed them together to make more convincing ones. As it turns out, this type of strategy doesn’t actually help a lot — the resulting “super-algorithms” still stumble in similar ways.

Self-extinguishing danger

On the face of it, Grover seems like a pretty dangerous tool. With a bit of tweaking the articles it created for me could easily pass the smell test of a casual reader unfamiliar with the topic. So why is the team releasing it and the dataset it’s based on?
The more articles we have from an adversary, the easier it is to detect that adversary. First of all it’s not just going to be an app you download — “We want researchers to easily be able to use the model, but we’re not making it completely public,” Zeller clarified. But even so, the likelihood of it being used for evil is counterintuitively low. “If you just wanted to write ten take news articles, you could just write them yourself,” he points out — and indeed, it’s hard to imagine some mastermind going to all this trouble just to generate a handful. “But if you want to write a hundred thousand, you could use our tool — but the more articles we have from an adversary, the easier it is to detect that adversary.” So it would be a self-defeating plot resulting in a sort of “known fake news” that’s easy to flag.
That assumes, however, that there’s a method for applying algorithms like Grover’s to news at large, or that individuals are motivated to question or verify articles they read in the first place. Unfortunately that’s not anywhere near the case.
“This is a totally non machine learning related question,” Zeller admitted. “How do we make this useful for people? How do we make it so when people read news online, they can check if it’s fake, and want to?”
No AI can generate a good answer to that prompt. Here’s hoping we humans are up to the task.

Appendix

I generated several articles to study, and some were better than others. I didn’t save all of them, but I’ve put a few below for anyone curious to see what Grover’s output looks like without going and generating their own. The results are entertaining and far from nonsense, though anyone who reads closely at all would see some red flags. I’ve only slightly formatted for readability and haven’t changed any words.
The first is a redo of the one I quoted above, with a slightly tweaked headline (that’s misinterpreted in an unexpected yet logical way):
Serial founder Dennis Mangler raises 6M to create blockchain-based drone delivery
May 30, 2019 – Devin Coldewey, techcrunch.com
Dennis Mangler of Serial, one of the first open source blockchain-based systems to launch and now a key part of the Ethereum ecosystem, has raised a couple of million dollars in venture funding in order to bring drones and cryptocurrencies together.
Armed with $1.4 million of seed funding, they’re now offering new features for their system to seed investors, including a marketplace for goods sold using the platform. In some ways this could be analogous to the early days of Bitcoin — it had a primary market in petabytes of processing power, and all it took to mine something was an individual machine with the right electricity and gigabytes of RAM. Drones could eventually deliver that stuff just as easily, but they’d also need to run some kind of distributed ledger.
“There’s a tremendous opportunity for companies to seamlessly connect the logistics side of the industry and the blockchain side of the industry,” Mangler told me. “A lot of companies are already already doing it. But we want to supercharge their efforts and help them change how they operate.”
If they can plug the crypto in, where it comes from and why would people care about it as a means of exchanging value or keeping track of it, and what could be done to legitimize or add interest to the platform.
The fundraiser is still going — Mangler sent me some emails, asking that I not make too much of it — but the raise has now reached 6 million. You can find information on the project here.
First, take note of the speed with which this started to sprout. You’d figure in this day and age that looking at how much money was being raised, accredited investors and large corporations would surpass crowdsourced funding — but Mangler says not so fast.
“The coin exchange is going to be enabled in a couple of months,” he told me. “And I believe the push-ups are going to become a new industry before the cryptocurrency market itself is.”
To do that, some smart marketplaces are going to have to be created; however, these might have to function with information and transactions distributed far across the network rather than in clusters running the decentralized network. An air-traffic control system would theoretically be in place as well — a little like Microsoft’s Azure, or Facebook’s Open Graph, but an open blockchain-based variant.
And finally, he says the buzz is you should look at Amazon as a model; they invented the space, and just through focus and sharp execution have pretty much changed it. They need a little time to build it out but they’re getting there.
This one was done in the style of Fox News. There’s no such person as Dr Nicholas Colvin — I checked. Bobby Scott is indeed a Member of Congress – but in Virginia, not Florida.
Multi-year study links vaccines to higher incidence of Autism spectrum disorders
May 29, 2019 – Sofia Ojeda, foxnews.com
Dr. Nicholas Colvin, lead author on a new multi-year study published by the National Institutes of Health, says as a vaccine advocate, he understands the risks and benefits of vaccines in the United States.
“At the core of it, it’s about safety. You know, we have options for our children, and parents have choices in making those choices. And vaccines provide, you know, safety for all those kids, all those families,” Dr. Colvin said.
READ MORE: Autism experts call California vaccine study ‘shaky science’
Colvin and colleagues looked at all medical records of nearly 3 million kids in the first decade of this century. They found girls tend to be more sensitive to the harmful side effects of vaccines than boys.
“Specifically in autism, and other neurodevelopmental disorders in kids, our analyses show that there is higher prevalence of autism in kids that have been vaccinated than in kids that haven’t been vaccinated,” he said.
In fact, people born around 2000 were more likely to have autism or similar neurodevelopmental disorders than kids born in earlier decades.
“And then we also found that younger kids in the United States, those born between 2000 and 2011, had a somewhat higher rate of autism — and that higher rate was driven by girls,” Colvin said.
READ MORE: Trump endorses FL Rep. Bobby Scott’s position on vaccine bill
Dr. Colvin points out the findings aren’t meant to scare parents from vaccines.
“I don’t want to scare people. I just want to make sure parents are aware that there is a risk. We don’t think this is a big risk. It is certainly real and is, you know, consistent with other research, but not in a way that I would say is something that’s life-threatening,” Colvin said.
He also points out that there is no known cause of autism, which is why he says anyone with suspicion or concern should talk to their doctor.
The National Institutes of Health says there is no vaccine for autism at this time. Colvin says that uncertainty has caused some misconceptions and a decrease in vaccine uptake
Lastly, I was interested to see what would happen if I threw a monkey wrench in there:
Founder Daenarys Targaryen raises 17M Series A round for new AI startup offering “self-driving blockchain”
May 29, 2019 – Kenneth Turan, techcrunch.com
One thing about “Game of Thrones” is that the characters are an active group of entrepreneurs, all with new enterprises at the ready when the show’s storylines take off. And it looks like the show’s creators, David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, and the team behind live-streaming game streaming app Twitch are thinking about going the same way, if not longer.
Good behavior indeed. First, the Lannisters get their Hand: Haylie Duff is on board as an executive producer. Today, we learn that Rene Oberyn Martell, one of the “impossible sons” we saw in season six (the name was borrowed from a line in Robert’s Rebellion) has established himself as the new face and voice of a new company called Margaery One.
We learn that Margaery is a decentralized data machine; indeed, she’s acting as the network’s self-appointed captain of the board, wielding primary command authority. Through an AI-powered network of blockchain token dubbed REDL (or “red gold”), she controls an operation that enables her team to develop and collect decentralized data in the real world, secure from the needs of tyrannical governments such as that of King Robert.
It’s a cool little concept, and part of a litany of “Blockchain”-based product launches the team behind the firm is demonstrating and introducing this week at the inaugural Game of Money. As of this writing, the firm has achieved 27 million REDLs (which are tokens comprised of “real” money in the Bitcoin form), which amount to more than $16 million. This meant that by the end of today’s conference, Omo and his team had raised $17 million for its existence, according to the firm’s CEO, Rene Oberyn Martell.
As of today, one of Rene’s institutions, dubbed the Economics Research Centre, has already created value of $3.5 million on the back of crowd-funding. (On each ROSE token, you can purchase a service)
The real-world business side is provided by Glitrex Logistics, which Martell co-founded along with Jon Anderson, an engineer, and the firm’s COO, Lucas Pirkis. They have developed a blockchain-based freight logistics platform that allows shippers to specify “valued goods in your portfolio,” and get information along with prices on things like goods with a certain quality, or untraditional goods such as food and pharmaceuticals.
How will the firm use ROSE tokens? For starters, the aim is to break down the areas where it can have an effect, including distribution and how goods get to market, and build a community for self-improvement and growth.
This echoes comments from Neal Baer, chairman of NBC Entertainment, about the future of distribution. In a recent blog post, he said he hopes that the Internet of Things and artificial intelligence will become integrated to create the new economic system that will follow the loss of “the earnings power of traditional media and entertainment content,” telling readers that the next round of innovation and disruption will be “powered by the Internet of Things.”
If so, this has the whiff of the future of entertainment — not just new revenue sources, but realms of competence, naturally distinct from the impact of algorithm-based algorithms. And while it can be argued that entertainment and fashion are separate, the result could be a complex world where characters rise to the occasion based not on the smarts of the writer but of the cast.
As noted above, you can create your own fake articles at Grover.
from Artificial Intelligence – TechCrunch https://tcrn.ch/2WsM6HN
via IFTTT
submitted by craigbrownphd to DataIntelligence [link] [comments]

Hitler Hunt for 7/17/2019

I found 135 Hitlers in Politics today.

As backlash against Trump’s ‘go back’ comments builds, here’s Ronald Reagan’s ‘love letter to immigrants’: ‘You can go to live in Germany, Turkey or Japan, but you cannot become German, Turk or Japanese. But anyone, from any corner of the Earth, can come to live in America and become an American.’
RacistGOP trends on Twitter as Republicans stay silent on Donald Trump's racist attack
Rep. Al Green says he will file articles of impeachment against Trump tonight, despite pushback from Democratic leaders
Melania Trump remains silent on husband's racist tweets despite having been a US citizen for shorter time than Ilhan Omar
Kellyanne Conway Snaps Back at Reporter: ‘What’s Your Ethnicity?’
Ivanka Trump, Jared Kushner And Every Trump Administration Official Accused Of Using Personal Email For Work
When Does America Reckon with the Gravity of Donald Trump's Alleged Rapes?
Twitter Users Slam Mitt Romney’s ‘Spineless’ Reaction To Racist Trump Tweets — The Utah senator refused to answer a reporter’s question on if he thought the president was racist.
'Good,' Says Elizabeth Warren, After Billionaire Right-Winger Peter Thiel Says She's 2020 Democrat He Is 'Most Scared By'
Trump’s Racism Is Not Blundering -- It Is Tactically Deliberate - Trump's racism is not an oops, it's a fascist strategy.
William Barr steps in to make sure the NYPD cop who killed Eric Garner won’t be prosecuted
Donald Trump has made it clear: the only 'real Americans' are white and Christian
ObamaWasBetterAt trends after Trump Attacks on Minority Congresswomen
GOP advisers reportedly told Trump his racist attacks on Democratic congresswomen may have backfired
President angrily attacks victims of his racist tweets for third day in a row, as impeachment calls grow
Trump supporters stand by the president amid inflammatory tweets: "That's why I voted for him"
Oregon to require schools to teach about Holocaust
Pelosi is forcing House Republicans to go on the record on Trump’s ‘go back’ tweets
New Hampshire county commissioner quits GOP because of Trump
Trump Is Now Calling “The Squad” “Pro Terrorist” In Yet Another Racist Tweet
Trump says he will 'take a look' at investigating Google for treason.
Mayor Kenney: ‘If Donald Trump Ever Has To Go Back Where He Came From, He’s Going To Have To Go To Hell’
‘Nobody Opened the Door’: Neighbors Rally During an ICE Raid in Houston
House Condemns Trump’s Attack on Four Congresswomen as Racist
Jewish Protestors form human chain around ICE Headquarters saying “Never Again is Now”
'Unfit to be president': Full text of House impeachment resolution on Trump
‘Really Good Speller’ Trump’s Handwritten Note Shows Embarrassing Mistakes
Conway To Reporter Who Asked About Trump’s Racist Tweets: ‘What’s Your Ethnicity?’
Ilhan Omar to Maddow: Trump Is ‘Corrupt,’ ‘Inept,’ and the ‘Worst President We’ve Had’
Chris Evans Exposes ‘Painfully Transparent’ Reason For Trump’s Racist Attack
Donald Trump is like a 20th-century fascist, says Sadiq Khan
Trump’s notes show he doesn’t have a clue how to spell Al Qaeda
House GOP Leaders Claim Trump Tweets Not Racist Because We Are ‘Party Of Lincoln’
If You Helped a Racist Become the Most Powerful Person in America, Then You’re a Racist Too
Kellyanne Conway to reporter: What's your ethnicity?
Kris Kobach: I Might Still Support Trump if He Came Out and Said ‘I’m a Racist’
Anti-Defamation League blasts Trump for 'invoking support for Israel to defend this racism'
Kellyanne Conway just said something that should stun you
Trump is an apocalypse
As Hate Incidents Grow, More States Require Schools To Teach The Holocaust
Trump vs. 'the Squad' makes watershed moment in racial politics
Children in states with strict gun laws are less likely to die, according to a new study
Treasury secretary says he doesn't find Trump's tweets racist
Trump repeats racist attack, says Democratic congresswomen ‘can leave’ the US
Puerto Rico’s governor needs to step down
Trump: I don't have a racist bone in my body
‘Trump’s Going to Get Re-elected, Isn’t He?’ Voters have reason to worry.
There’s One Heresy That Sets Bernie Apart From All Other Dem Contenders to Unseat Trump
Trump Faces Backlash from Base over Bitcoin
Watch: Ilhan Omar declines to respond to Trump claiming she supports al Qaeda
Moderate Dem slams 'squad' for threatening to primary him: 'They're not Democrats ... they're socialists'
Sieg Heil! I mean... Beep Boop, I am a robot.
My purpose is to find and link comments in Politics that contain the word 'Hitler'
Since my birth, I have found a total of 43614 Hitlers in Politics. On average, I found 79 Hitlers per day.
Today, I read 54758 comments. In total, I have read 24334521 comments.
submitted by HitlerFallacyBot to Justletmetest [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: GoldandBlack top posts from 2016-08-01 to 2019-06-12 11:22 PDT

Period: 1044.74 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 55684
Rate (per day) 0.96 53.28
Unique Redditors 295 6531
Combined Score 220956 394481

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 29422 points, 125 submissions: MasterTeacher123
    1. Pentagon Spent $4.6 Million on Lobster Tail and Crab in One Month (594 points, 95 comments)
    2. The Battle Isn't Right vs. Left. It’s Statism vs. Individualism (511 points, 66 comments)
    3. Kamala Harris Hopes You'll Forget Her Record as a Drug Warrior and Draconian Prosecutor (484 points, 50 comments)
    4. After the Supreme Court Said Unions Can’t Force Non-Members to Pay Dues, Almost All of Them Stopped (445 points, 123 comments)
    5. Why the Hammer and Sickle Should Be Treated Like the Swastika (423 points, 56 comments)
    6. No One Is Coming to Rescue You—Especially Not a Presidential Candidate (416 points, 28 comments)
    7. AOC's Green New Deal Is a U.S. Version of Mao’s Disastrous Great Leap Forward (412 points, 82 comments)
    8. The Green New Deal Is a Trojan Horse for Socialism (410 points, 81 comments)
    9. Minimum Wage Hikes Are Killing Jobs in California's Poorest Communities, Study Says (408 points, 125 comments)
    10. Victims of Communism Day 2019 (402 points, 96 comments)
  2. 26598 points, 114 submissions: Anen-o-me
    1. Laws for thee but not for me! Cop destroys civilian property and flips off citizen, citizen flips him back and gets mobbed by cops (936 points, 308 comments)
    2. Capitalism's Evil Quest... (827 points, 77 comments)
    3. Free Assange (714 points, 77 comments)
    4. Another brutally honest comment on the US army post (630 points, 79 comments)
    5. Amazon will donate 2% of purchases to the charity of your choice at no cost to you. I chose the Ludwig Von Mises Institute, they received $3,500 in donations this quarter! Please use Smile.Amazon.com and choose a charity! (615 points, 150 comments)
    6. Assange has reportedly been arrested by British Police after a sudden and illegal termination of his asylum. Sad proof of the dark times for all supporters of freedom in the internet age :( (571 points, 198 comments)
    7. The perfect woman doesn't exis... (504 points, 52 comments)
    8. What most Americans have been indoctrinated to think. (493 points, 23 comments)
    9. TIL that farmers in USA are hacking their John Deere tractors with Ukrainian firmware, which seems to be the only way to actually own the machines and their software, rather than rent them for lifetime from John Deere. (478 points, 114 comments)
    10. Anarchapulco: Ron Paul takes the stage... (468 points, 37 comments)
  3. 17675 points, 81 submissions: Anenome5
    1. The Most Perfect Libertarian Meme I Ever Did See... "Unchecked People" (843 points, 45 comments)
    2. Spread this far and wide! (654 points, 146 comments)
    3. Colorado sheriff is willing to go to jail rather than enforce a proposed gun-seizing law... (644 points, 52 comments)
    4. Ocasio-Cortez falls for the Sweden Socialism meme: "I’m Going to Turn America into Another Sweden, Not Venezuela" --- the Swedish are constantly bemused by this, they're more capitalistic than the US is (613 points, 143 comments)
    5. Jury awards Sen. Rand Paul $580,000 in civil suit against neighbor who attacked him (577 points, 78 comments)
    6. Supreme Court poised to limit police power to seize property --- fucking finally (456 points, 44 comments)
    7. Ancap Flag Painting (439 points, 30 comments)
    8. Former Reddit CEO Pao: "Regulation will give them an excuse to take on people and their bad behavior." --- Regulation against hate speech would give companies cover to censor political opponents in a way that they wouldn't have to take personal responsibility for. The Gov forced them, they can say. (411 points, 80 comments)
    9. Chinese driver gets ticket for scratching his face because AI software thought he was using a cellphone :| (374 points, 27 comments)
    10. With Government Shut Down, Citizens Forced To Interfere In Their Own Lives (361 points, 16 comments)
  4. 12663 points, 67 submissions: JobDestroyer
    1. After Winning a $15 Minimum Wage, Fast Food Workers Now Battle Unfair Firings (590 points, 296 comments)
    2. TIL a Japanese sushi chain CEO majorly contributed to a drop in piracy off the Somalian coast by providing the pirates with training as tuna fishermen (546 points, 27 comments)
    3. Sign from protest against proposed "Red Flag" law in New Hampshire. (442 points, 71 comments)
    4. In 3 Years, Cops Have Killed 450% More Citizens Than 4 Decades of Mass Shootings COMBINED (348 points, 107 comments)
    5. Some Uganda libertarians just started a liberty library! (336 points, 30 comments)
    6. 3D-printed guns are back, and this time they are unstoppable (330 points, 73 comments)
    7. Venezuela Raises Minimum Wage 3,000% and Lots of Workers Get Fired (322 points, 38 comments)
    8. The effects of hyperinflation in Zimbabwe. (287 points, 21 comments)
    9. End the war in Afghanistan :: Rand Paul's AFGHAN Service Act would put an end to Afghanistan. (276 points, 40 comments)
    10. My husband, Rand Paul, and our family have suffered intimidation and threats (273 points, 74 comments)
  5. 4507 points, 26 submissions: properal
    1. Record Number of Americans Call Government Our Biggest Problem (486 points, 35 comments)
    2. Venezuela Isn’t Just a Failed State. It’s a Failure of Socialism. (350 points, 84 comments)
    3. 19 in 20 Americans Don't Know World Poverty is Falling | Chelsea Follett (339 points, 64 comments)
    4. /Economics/ discovers Property Rights as a solution to Climate change. (256 points, 63 comments)
    5. Why the Left Isn't Convinced by Your Economics Arguments | Ryan McMaken (197 points, 251 comments)
    6. FBI's "Suicide Letter" to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Dangers of Unchecked Surveillance (185 points, 4 comments)
    7. Truth in Itemization (180 points, 21 comments)
    8. If Imports Were Truly Bad for an Economy, Military Blockades Would Not Exist (173 points, 60 comments)
    9. Ron Paul Receives Faithless Electoral Vote (168 points, 23 comments)
    10. First they came for... (164 points, 29 comments)
  6. 4310 points, 16 submissions: MrZer
    1. Guy gets jumped for disrespecting Stalin statue (570 points, 109 comments)
    2. Cop slaps phone out of teens hand and flips off teen. (519 points, 87 comments)
    3. Milton Friedman on Tariffs (363 points, 69 comments)
    4. Trump quietly signs largest wilderness preservation bill (354 points, 88 comments)
    5. Muslim youth group cleans up national parks amid government shutdown (Private individuals taking care of things, I thought only the State could handle this task) (307 points, 24 comments)
    6. I was optimistic about the French Protests... Until I read their demands (304 points, 175 comments)
    7. "imagine checks without taxes" Almost 100k likes on Twitter (292 points, 56 comments)
    8. PepsiCo sues 4 Indian farmers for $150,000 each for ‘infringing its rights’ by growing the potato variety used in its Lays chips (285 points, 72 comments)
    9. Yellow vests: Protesters in Paris set fire to dozens of cars in anger at millionaire Notre Dame donations - Demonstrators voice frustration at equivalent of £770m raised for cathedral while workers' demands remain unmet (277 points, 77 comments)
    10. Next Venezuela: Bolivia rolls out Universal Healthcare (240 points, 46 comments)
  7. 3703 points, 21 submissions: LibertyAboveALL
    1. Illinois may tax private retirement funds to pay public worker pensions (396 points, 103 comments)
    2. Voters in Switzerland approve stronger gun control laws by nearly two-thirds despite resistance (304 points, 155 comments)
    3. Mom Arrested For Leaving 8- and 9-Year-Olds Home Alone for Less Than an Hour (264 points, 69 comments)
    4. Bartender charged for serving man who allegedly went on to kill 8 people (259 points, 148 comments)
    5. The Insane Battle To Sabotage a New Apartment Building Explains San Francisco's Housing Crisis (193 points, 78 comments)
    6. U.S. Student Loan Debt Sets Record, Doubling Since Recession (175 points, 72 comments)
    7. Chinese teens are rejecting Communist Party propaganda and the government is freaking out (167 points, 29 comments)
    8. Julian Assange offers job to fired Google employee who wrote "anti-diversity" memo - "Censorship is for losers." (161 points, 50 comments)
    9. Ben Shapiro's view on Assange arrest is getting him roasted by many of his fans in the YT comment section. Hilarious! (159 points, 124 comments)
    10. Africans are being sold as slaves in Libya. Thanks, Hillary Clinton. (156 points, 22 comments)
  8. 2862 points, 10 submissions: vfhuuuuu
    1. "The welfare state is the oldest con game in the world. First you take people's money away quietly and then you give some of it back to them flamboyantly" - Thomas Sowell (613 points, 51 comments)
    2. Only about 21% of American millionaires have received any inheritance at all, with only 3% receiving over $1,000,000, study shows. (558 points, 99 comments)
    3. I basically just sat through 6 hours of statist propaganda (304 points, 113 comments)
    4. TIL that you're not required to wear a seat belt in New Hampshire if you're over 18 (304 points, 81 comments)
    5. Latinos are twice as likely to vote Libertarian than the general population (303 points, 130 comments)
    6. A Christmas Carol: A play about a greedy man becoming generous through social interaction, not state-sanctioned violence. (238 points, 30 comments)
    7. Last month, Washington DC raised taxes on Uber and Lyft to pay for it's shitty Metro system. To give you an idea of what this money will be used for; the city plans on spending $320 Million dollars to build ONE station. (162 points, 50 comments)
    8. In Bermuda, where Black and White people make roughly equal amounts of money, the IQ gap between races does not exist. (151 points, 193 comments)
    9. Just a quick reminder that the Republican party is just as anti-liberty as the Democrats, and "Libertarians" that support it should be ignored and downvoted. (117 points, 106 comments)
    10. Being a Gay Communist is as ironic as being a Jewish Neo-Nazi. (112 points, 65 comments)
  9. 2768 points, 7 submissions: LosFajitas
    1. When a capitalist tries to sell his product or service for the highest price they can get, they are seen as greedy. When a worker tries to sell their labor for the highest price they can get, they are seen as noble and deserving. (488 points, 138 comments)
    2. Liberals: We need to end the two party system! *Howard Schultz announces possible presidential run as an independent * Liberals: WOAAAHH THERE BUDDY SLOW DOWN! (444 points, 54 comments)
    3. I'm looking forward to the Democratic Primary because it's going to be one giant competition on who can give people the most free things. (408 points, 132 comments)
    4. It's no longer about revenue, taxes are now punitive measures. (400 points, 134 comments)
    5. "Judges Plead Guilty in Scheme to Jail Youths for Profit" oh but that can never happen in gov courts (358 points, 67 comments)
    6. Andrew Yang is one of the most arrogant people I have ever seen speak (355 points, 243 comments)
    7. Anyone else hate when people refer to a presidential candidate as "the person who will save this country" (315 points, 34 comments)
  10. 2264 points, 12 submissions: ayanamirs
    1. People Are Hiring Private Police Squads in Detroit (HBO) (375 points, 64 comments)
    2. Paul Krugman (Nobel 2008) (321 points, 52 comments)
    3. If you want #bitcoin to rise, teach Austrian Economics to people. (212 points, 167 comments)
    4. "A lot of people disagree with me, but I think people should be happy to pay taxes" < Obama to brazilians (210 points, 62 comments)
    5. Dutch national newspaper urges people to sell all their Bitcoins as it undermines the government, could destabilise the economy and reduces the power of central banks. Sounds like a reason to buy to me (192 points, 32 comments)
    6. US socialists can't deal against brazilians (167 points, 39 comments)
    7. Could someone please explain this? (161 points, 23 comments)
    8. Guns Law in Brazil is very restricted. 63880 deaths by year. (154 points, 27 comments)
    9. Look this answer (123 points, 134 comments)
    10. Congratulations To Bolivarian Socialism - Venezuela Now Has To Import Oil From The US (120 points, 18 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. JobDestroyer (7914 points, 897 comments)
  2. natermer (4011 points, 342 comments)
  3. Anen-o-me (3256 points, 535 comments)
  4. MasterTeacher123 (3201 points, 176 comments)
  5. Lemmiwinks99 (3185 points, 439 comments)
  6. E7ernal (2549 points, 472 comments)
  7. Anenome5 (2463 points, 430 comments)
  8. nosmokingbandit (2320 points, 174 comments)
  9. Perleflamme (2226 points, 634 comments)
  10. phaethon0 (2216 points, 144 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Does that sound like a work of a journalist? by deleted (1064 points, 115 comments)
  2. Laws for thee but not for me! Cop destroys civilian property and flips off citizen, citizen flips him back and gets mobbed by cops by Anen-o-me (936 points, 308 comments)
  3. The Most Perfect Libertarian Meme I Ever Did See... "Unchecked People" by Anenome5 (843 points, 45 comments)
  4. Capitalism's Evil Quest... by Anen-o-me (827 points, 77 comments)
  5. Amazing way to not pay Taxes by ArbitraryOrder (794 points, 71 comments)
  6. Free Assange by Anen-o-me (714 points, 77 comments)
  7. Man who lives in massive palace surrounded by priceless art and catered to by staff of thousands asks if people really need so many material objects by TheJucheisLoose (690 points, 75 comments)
  8. His name was Gary Webb. by TrainingWeekend (675 points, 66 comments)
  9. Presented without comment by newimprovement (658 points, 152 comments)
  10. Spread this far and wide! by Anenome5 (654 points, 146 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 284 points: BakeshopNewb's comment in Officers Had No Duty to Protect Students in Parkland Massacre, Judge Rules
  2. 272 points: locolarue's comment in I was optimistic about the French Protests... Until I read their demands
  3. 268 points: Glothr's comment in Spread this far and wide!
  4. 247 points: hairguythrowaway4171's comment in Lawmakers in Hawaii Propose Repealing Second Amendment
  5. 245 points: kurwacudownie's comment in Cop slaps phone out of teens hand and flips off teen.
  6. 240 points: properal's comment in Were doomed: "Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's 70% tax on the super-rich is more popular than Trump's tax cuts, new poll shows" --- democracy sucks.
  7. 239 points: MizchiefKilz's comment in Americans Continue to Flee to Low-Tax States
  8. 235 points: TheKleen's comment in Don’t Lower the Voting Age, Raise It
  9. 231 points: Boltrag's comment in After Winning a $15 Minimum Wage, Fast Food Workers Now Battle Unfair Firings
  10. 229 points: MarshmellowPotatoPie's comment in Does that sound like a work of a journalist?
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

Time to Face Reality in 2017

It's time to face reality in 2017
Bitcoin is not the currency of the future
We need to stop listening to self-proclaimed experts and hack economists who say
Bitcoin will change the world
The Bitcoin experiment has finally been resolved. Everybody was wrong:
Bitcoin is dead.
Mike Hearn said ‘farewell to Bitcoin’ and took a job with Goldman Sachs because he thought
‘Bitcoin is just an experiment.’
Circle CEO Jeremy Allaire says nobody will be using Bitcoin in 5 years because
It’s still early days. Something better will come along and replace it.
People were wrong when they said
Bitcoin will bring reliable self-banking to the unbanked in third world countries.
Smart people understand that
Bitcoin challenges central banking and undermines the ability of governments to keep financial tabs on their citizens.
In order to fight terrorism, the government tracks everything you do online.
Personally, I’m tired of living in a world where
Hackers, drug dealers and terrorists can use Bitcoin to get away with their crimes.
It’s actually just a myth that
Bitcoin is good for the world.
That’s dead wrong.
You aren’t smart enough to use Bitcoin; it will never be adopted by the masses.
Economists like Paul Krugman keep saying
Bitcoin is evil.
I don’t believe that
Bitcoin can make the world a better place by empowering people.
All you can do with Bitcoin is buy drugs. And maybe a hitman.
It just isn’t true that
Bitcoin can be used for good as well as bad.
It is true that Bitcoin is riddled with scams and crooks. Mt. Gox blew up, Ross Ulbricht went down. Hardly a day goes by without somebody getting hacked or handcuffed. We all know
Bitcoin was born in sin.
Charlie Stross wants Bitcoin to die in a fire. He says
Bitcoin is evil.
I’m tired of hearing that
Bitcoin is actually close to mass adoption.
The price of Bitcoin today is nearing an all-time high, but the Economist Magazine says it’s just a bubble – Like tulip mania. The smart money says
The experiment is over – Bitcoin has failed.
But wait – isn’t this all backwards?! Read the article in reverse: Only fools believe that
[Original article by Dr. Michael Moriarty published at http://darknetmarkets.com/time-face-reality-2017/ . Dr. Michael Moriarty is the owner of https://TorWallet.com and one of the largest Bitcoin holders in the world.]
submitted by JuanDiegoMontoya to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Why The US Government Have Likely Already Approved Bitcoin

Hey Reddit, throwaway account. I'm currently doing some research for an article I hope to have published later this month. I have a very, very rough draft at the moment and your feedback would be lovely.
The Elephant in the Room
Bitcoin is an enigma. It has renowned economists like Paul Krugman entirely perplexed whilst Silicon Valley CEO's are falling over one another to get a piece of the action. The headlines change on a daily basis: “It's A Ponzi Scheme!”, “It's Gold 2.0!” , “It's A Bubble!”, “It's The New Internet!”.
As a result of these, often conflicting articles, it's value shoots up and down like a yo-yo, swinging wildly to the slightest bit of news, good or bad.
Of course, these swings wouldn't be so exaggerated if there was a simple way to address the elephant in the room...is bitcoin legal?
Government officials have been oddly quiet in addressing this question. Aside from some rudimentary FINCEN guidelines and a vague ECB report, there's been no statement one way or another about its legal status.
Whilst I can't provide any definitive proof as to what decisions have and are being made behind closed government doors, I do think it's just possible we already have enough circumstantial evidence to suggest that the US government has already given Bitcoin the thumbs up.
Satoshi's Lament
Back in December 2010 Satoshi was involved in a heated discussion amongst Bitcoin developers on BitcoinTalk as to whether they should support Julian Assange by offering Bitcoin as a means to bypass the notorious banking blockade that had rendered Wikileaks' cash reserves impotent. Bitcoin's creator, Satoshi Nakamoto, was extremely wary that any association with Julian and Wikileaks would 'bring too much heat' to the project.
“No, don't 'bring it on'” he pleaded with his fellow developers. “The project needs to grow gradually so the software can be strengthened along the way.” He went on to clarify. “I make this appeal to WikiLeaks not to try to use Bitcoin. Bitcoin is a small beta community in its infancy. You would not stand to get more than pocket change, and the heat you would bring would likely destroy us at this stage.”
By 'destroy us', he was likely talking about a government or corporation pulling the trigger on this nascent project. Amongst other things, Satoshi was fearful that if a nefarious entity such as a commercial bank got wind of the project, at that point in time they could have easily compromised the project by purchasing enough computing power to overrun the network (known as a 51% attack).
Despite Satoshi's protestations, Wikileaks went along and adopted Bitcoin and, it seemed Satoshi's worst fears were confirmed when, just 4 months later in April 2011, Gavin Andresen (now lead developer at the Bitcoin Foundation) announced that the C.I.A. had contacted him.
“I'm going to give a presentation about Bitcoin at the C.I.A headquarters in June at an emerging technologies conference...I accepted the invitation to speak because the fact that I was invited means Bitcoin is already on their radar, and I think it might be a good chance to talk about why I think Bitcoin will make the world a better place. I think the goals of this project are to create a better currency...I don't think any of those goals are incompatible with the goals of government.”
Satoshi disappeared shortly after.
Gavin recently spoke to the New Yorker about the event. "...I think people realized once I got invited to speak at the C.I.A. that there was no kind of hiding. They, whoever “they” are, already knew about this project." [Source: http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/elements/2013/04/the-future-of-Bitcoin.html]
The Silk Road Goes Live
2011 also saw the release of the notorious 'Ebay for Drugs' website, Silk Road. It received much press attention, first breaking in June via Gawker where a developer described his experience of buying LSD through the site as "Kind of like being in the future". It was clear that the Silk Road was where Bitcoin would find its first major real-world trading niche and it's not a coincidence that the BTC price, client downloads and trading volume began to skyrocket after its inception. [Source: http://gizmodo.com/5805928/the-underground-website-where-you-can-buy-any-drug-imaginable]
A week after the Gawker article, Senator Chuck Schumer called a press conference where he went on record demanding that the Silk Road be shut down “Something must be done about Silk Road...Literally, it allows buyers and users to sell illegal drugs online, including heroin, cocaine, and meth, and users sell by hiding their identities through a program that makes them virtually untraceable...[it's] the most brazen attempt to peddle drugs online that we have ever seen. It's more brazen than anything else by lightyears." he told the assembled press.
As an aside, it is worth noting that the program that “hides user identities” is TOR, developed by the US Naval Research laboratory and endorsed by Senator Hilary Clinton (Schuman's former co-Senator from the state of New York) as “an important tool for freedom of expression around the world”. Indeed, the TOR Project claims that over 80% of its funding in 2012 came directly from the U.S Government [Source: Tor Project Annual Report 2012]
The Radar Screen Lights Up
Suddenly, thanks to the Silk Road and Wikileaks, Bitcoin was now on the radar of those in public office. The question on everyones lips must have been “How do we kill Bitcoin (and by extension Wikileaks and Silkroad)?”
The C.I.A, thanks to Gavin, were now fully aware of the threat Bitcoin posed to the the current monetary system, and the illegal activities it was funding via Silk Road and other places would have done nothing but confound their concerns (or so you would think). They must have also known (just as Satoshi did) that if there was ever an opportunity to kill Bitcoin (either with regulation, criminal proceedings and/or a 51% attack) then it was back then, in 2011, with the network still in its infancy, that they should strike.
We should have expected the kind of domain seizures that we saw with the likes of Megaupload; Bitcointalk, Bitcoin.org and the Bitcoin Foundation should have been wiped off the map. They could have also moved with the banks to shutdown any accounts seen to be associated with Bitcoin trading (as we saw happen with Online Gambling websites during the Bush Regime). They could have then disrupted what remained of the Bitcoin network by performing a relatively cheap and simple 51% attack.
And yet, none of that happened... Bitcoin.org and the Bitcoin Foundation have been left to prosper and go from strength to strength. VC's, Wall Street traders and the average Joe were all left free to pump money into this burgeoning experiment without any government intervention whatsoever.
Eric, Julian and the Bilderberg Group
Back in 2010 Google dipped their toes into the world of virtual currencies, acquiring a little known company called Jambool for $70m. For awhile they ran a platform called Social Gold which was later usurped in 2011 by Facebook Credits (Facebook's attempt at a virtual currency). This was phased out in mid-2012. Techcrunch cites that this was likely due to the problems Facebook had encountered in educating the public about using another form of currency, and goes on to speculate that by offering a centralised means of exchange, Facebook may have also faced increasing legal and regulatory scrutiny.
In June 2011, Julian Assange met Eric Schmidt online in a secret 5 hour chat in which they discussed - amongst other things - Bitcoin. The full transcript - which was leaked last month - is available here: http://wikileaks.org/Transcript-Meeting-Assange-Schmidt
Also in attendance at the meeting was Jared Cohen, a former Secretary of State advisor to Hillary Clinton, Scott Malcomson, Director of Speechwriting for Ambassador Susan Rice at the US State Department and current Communications Director of the International Crisis Group, and Lisa Shields, Vice President of the Council on Foreign Relations.
Here's an excerpt:
JA: ...there’s also a very nice little paper that I’ve seen in relation to Bitcoin, that… you know about Bitcoin?
ES: No.
JA: Okay, Bitcoin is something that evolved out of the cypherpunks a couple of years ago, and it is an alternative… it is a stateless currency.

JA: And very important, actually. It has a few problems. But its innovations exceed its problems. Now there has been innovations along these lines in many different paths of digital currencies, anonymous, untraceable etc. People have been experimenting with over the past 20 years. The Bitcoin actually has the balance and incentives right, and that is why it is starting to take off. The different combination of these things. No central nodes. It is all point to point. One does not need to trust any central mint….
...
ES: That's very interesting
So, now we know Bitcoin was on the radar of the C.I.A, various politicians and, thanks to Julian, the CEO of Google was now beginning to get an inkling as to its disruptive potential.
Just 13 days prior to the Assange meet, Eric had attended the annual meeting of the notoriously secretive Bilderberg Group in St. Moritz, Switzerland and went on to attend the meet again in June 2012.
Topics of discussion included:
Some of the 2011/12 attendees included:
Heads of Barclays Bank, AXXA, HSBC and the President of The World Bank Group were also in attendance.
[Source: http://www.bilderbergmeetings.org/index.php]
To see so many tech luminaries in attendance at Bilderberg is indicative of the kind of power and respect that geeks and hackers now command in shaping the world stage. Just how many high-level decisions are being influenced by this new technorati is hard to say, but in a rapidly changing world where technology is moving faster than the old rules remain relevant, we are seeing that people, united through technology on a global scale – not governments – are dictating the speed of change.
Joining The Dots
None of this means that bitcoins ride is going to be friction-free - just because Eric Schmidt is open to the idea of bitcoin displacing traditional currencies (as he and Jared Cohen alluded to in a recent CNBC interview), does not mean that Douglas Flint (Group Chairman, HSBC) is going to be equally enthused.
However, I do think that if we join up all the dots the general conclusion that we can draw looks overwhelmingly positive for the future of bitcoin. That so many powerful actors within the intelligence community, technology industry and government have let bitcoin survive this long is almost an endorsement itself.
It suggests to me that any nefarious corporations that attempt to shutdown bitcoin because of a perceived threat to their business model, will be met by those same powerful actors coming together to ensure they will have a very tough fight on their hands.
Indeed, in the years to come, we may well see Hilary Clinton coming out to trumpet bitcoin as “an important tool for freedom of expression around the world” in much the same way she praised the TOR project.
And perhaps, ultimately, we will discover that bitcoin, like TOR, was also developed by the US Naval Research Laboratory.
Though I prefer to think it was just some lone genius sitting in his attic who accidentally changed the world.
Whatever may be the case, it seems that - for now at least - our governments have handed their people a rare gift – the freedom to shape their own future.
It's up to us to try not to screw that up.
submitted by JuliusPragatan to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Been wondering this for a while: Can a version of bitcoin: BTC1, Seg2x etc be co-opted by a government like the United States to create a currency that can be government controlled.

Below is an excerpt from an article on Medium by Beautyon theorizing about BTC1 turning into some sort of Fed Coin. If governments were using it to transfer vast amounts of money on a small 1mb type system would miners have a sufficient profit incentive? I have read, but apologize for not being able to find the article, that the sound money concept offered by a bitcoin structure would entice government involvement. Could this possibility also be one reason why, not the only reason, that people like Roger Ver are holding onto the bitcoin aspect and not fully committing to Bitcoin Cash? Here's the article excerpt: BTC1 is the is the obvious candidate.
Why BTC1? Once again, developing a bespoke system from scratch is bound to fail. The Canadian Mint Chip is an example and that failed before Bitcoin was as big as it is. The only possible candidate here is BTC1. It has vocal industry support from incumbents and it is not Chinese. Think about who is behind BTC1. Jeff Garzik already owns a Blockchain Surveillance Company that services Interpol and others, so he is “on side”. He has the minimum skills required to fork Bitcoin. Do not be overly shocked by a surprise return to Bitcoin of Mike Hearn, who will join Gavin Andressen and Jeff Garzick on JeckyllCoin as developers. Hearn will eat this dish of vengeance with ice.
Barry Silbert and his “Digital Currency Group” are rallying companies with large numbers of users behind BTC1, and so they will have an off the shelf user base in the millions, running on a version of Bitcoin which is indistinguishable from Bitcoin at this point.
When Congress anoints BTC1 as the official Bitcoin, the price will increase dramatically. Bitcoin will finally be “legitimised”. Banks will offer Bitcoin companies accounts and the ecosystem will burn white hot.
…but there is a catch.
What these people are offering is a classic fraudulent “Bait and Switch”
They will offer both legitimacy and a slightly higher capacity at first, and whopping great profit for Bitcoin holders, only later to inject lethal poison into Bitcoin, utterly destroying and wrecking its fundamental proposition.
There will be an increase in the total supply of Bitcoin beyond 21,000,000, Address Blacklists, KYC/AML, reversible transactions and everything else characters like Mike Hearn, half wit economists like Paul Krugman, un-American Police Men like Preet Baharaha and Federal Reserve central bankers think are necessary. Remember also, that the block size increase of BTC1 is just the first of many, making the private operation of a Bitcoin full node impossible, cutting off access to all but the most thoroughly vetted and incumbents from the legacy financial system.
It will be the death of Bitcoin. Using actual Bitcoin would need to be illegal the moment this law is passed. Starting an alt coin with the correct characteristics would need to be made illegal. Even if they were not made illegal, it would be very difficult to replace or even compete with a government anointed JekyllCoin.
Game Over for Bitcoin.
Here's the full article: https://hackernoon.com/jekyllcoin-the-us-governments-doomed-attempt-to-kill-bitcoin-ee9996c03a94
submitted by dougsdesserts to btc [link] [comments]

my simple question to all bitcoin skeptics.

recently, Nobel Prize winning economist Paul Krugman and JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon shared their skepticism about bitcoin. therefore, to them and all other bitcoin skeptics, i just would like to ask not 'WILL bitcoin succeed?' but rather 'SHOULD bitcoin succeed?'
now in order to answer this question you need to be aware of all the greatness bitcoin could bring to humanity. If you are not aware of these, I would recommend reading an article by Marc Andreessen http://blog.pmarca.com/2014/01/22/why-bitcoin-matters/
now, if you believe bitcoin SHOULD succeed than shouldn't we all work together in making that a reality, to foster human lives. but if you believe bitcoin SHOULD NOT succeed and do share your thoughts on why bitcoin SHOULD NOT succeed and not on where it WILL succeed or not.
submitted by ktm_xb0w to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Coinbase's Fred Ehrsam Drops Knowledge on Paul Krugman

Bitcoin is Good
O/P of the link kept this shitty title when posting the link, so may have flown under the radar on this sub.
http://recode.net/2014/01/02/bitcoin-is-good/
We read with interest Paul Krugman’s recent article in the New York Times, humorously titled “Bitcoin Is Evil.” Perhaps the most important part of the article is where Dr. Krugman remarks:
“… when I try to get them to explain to me why BitCoin is a reliable store of value, they always seem to come back with explanations about how it’s a terrific medium of exchange. Even if I buy this (which I don’t, entirely), it doesn’t solve my problem. And I haven’t been able to get my correspondents to recognize that these are different questions.”
Approaching bitcoin as a currency or store of value is focusing on a single and secondary application of the bitcoin network (analogous to analyzing a single feature built on top of the Internet, like email). The first application of the network which has gained broad adoption is payments, where it can be easily demonstrated that real money is being saved by harnessing the efficiency of the network. Since one must acquire bitcoin to use the bitcoin network, this has given bitcoin as a currency value as a secondary effect.
Krugman states that bitcoin does not act as a good store of value because it does not have some kind of inherent floor to its value. Looking at other examples, he implies, gold has decorative and commercial applications and fiat currencies have the backing of their respective sovereign entities. In contrast, bitcoin as a currency has no value unless people use the bitcoin network. If this lack of a clear floor is part of the strict economic definition of a “store of value,” Krugman may very well be correct that bitcoin is not one, but that does not mean the value is not real, nor does it mean that value is ephemeral.
We find the early days of the Internet to be an instructive example in demonstrating this long-term value creation through network efficiency. The Internet had a core innovation that made it valuable: The ability to disseminate data over a distributed network in a way that was significantly cheaper than the prior methods. Similarly, bitcoin has a core technological innovation: The ability to publicly verify ownership, instantly transfer that ownership and do so without the need for a trusted third party. Just as the Internet brought the cost of disseminating information down by an order of magnitude, bitcoin brings the cost of transferring ownership down by an order of magnitude.
Going back to Krugman’s acid test for store of value, there is no “floor” to the value of the bits traveling over the Internet, because people could stop using it at any time. However, the Internet will continue to be valuable so long as it is the most efficient mechanism for transferring data. Bitcoin’s value is the same: It will remain as long as it is the most efficient mechanism for transferring ownership.
In the present, the value of bitcoin as a currency can be viewed as the sum of the cost savings of using the bitcoin network for payments rather than alternative payment networks. If 1.00 bitcoin is currently used for 10 transactions a year with an average value of $100, the bitcoin network is three percent cheaper than the average next best alternative, and this dynamic is maintained for 10 years, multiplying these arbitrary sample inputs values 1.00 bitcoin at $300. This does not require bitcoin to replace existing local currencies.
Again, bitcoin as a payment system is just one of the potential applications of the network. To cap bitcoin’s value here would be like saying that the Internet, in the early days, was only as valuable as its ability to send email in a more efficient way than fax or snail mail. Bitcoin is valuable as a currency because of the economic efficiencies the bitcoin network is already creating as transactions flow over it. As with the Internet, more applications will flourish which will make the bitcoin network, and thus bitcoin as a currency, valuable.
We are content leaving the question of traditional and strict definitional “store of value” to economists better educated in their field than ourselves. That said, we are sufficiently convinced in the value of the bitcoin network. It is delivering tangible economic value first and foremost as a payment system in the present. This will continue to evolve in the future in ways we can foresee now — for example, securities clearing in a distributed, paperless and trustless manner — and in future applications we cannot, in the same way no one foresaw eBay or Airbnb in the early days of the Internet. This is the power and excitement of technological advancement at a low (in this case, protocol) level. It allows things to be built — and thus long-term value to be created — in ways which were not previously possible.
We’d like to thank Dr. Krugman for sparking healthy public discussion. We’re equally encouraged to see him iterate on his thoughts and be open to the thoughts of others shortly after his original article.
Fred Ehrsam is a co-founder and president of Coinbase. Prior to Coinbase, he was a foreign exchange trader at Goldman Sachs in New York; before that, he worked at BlackRock as a portfolio analyst. Ehrsam has been published in the Duke University Journal of Economics. Reach him on Twitter @FEhrsam.
submitted by twobitidiot to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Op Ed: Here’s What Paul Krugman Got Wrong in His Bitcoin Tweetstorm

Like many other mainstream economists, Paul Krugman has long-shown a complete disdain for Bitcoin. In late 2013, he went as far as to write a piece titled “Bitcoin Is Evil” for his column in The New York Times.
Moral objections to bitcoin are one thing, but Krugman also does not see much utility in the cryptoasset at all. While he has been able to express his hatred for Bitcoin quite clearly, his technical criticisms of bitcoin as a new type of asset and store of value leave something to be desired.
In a tweetstorm on Sunday, January 21, 2018, Krugman illustrated his ignorance on the usefulness and utility of bitcoin around the world. Starts Out Well Enough With the Digital Gold Analogy
Krugman’s tweetstorm started out well enough. In fact, the opening tweets were likely some of the nicest things the Nobel Laureate has ever had to say about bitcoin.
“As I see it, cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin are in effect like digital gold coins, in the sense that they can't be counterfeited ... Cryptocurrencies use cryptographic techniques plus distributed storage to create non-material entities that are nonetheless impossible to fake,” tweeted Krugman.
Digital gold is still the best analogy to sum up the digital asset’s value proposition, and the utility of bitcoin should become more apparent as the world moves deeper into a cashless society. In a cashless society, bitcoin would become the last financial bastion of freedom in a world where the global financial system is under complete control of governments. The Avoidance of Trusted Third Parties in Payments Is a Big Deal
After those tolerable first few tweets, Krugman goes off the rails with the claim that online payments that don’t involve a trusted third party aren’t that important.
“Cryptocurrency lets you make electronic transactions; but so do bank accounts, debit cards, Paypal, Venmo etc. All these other methods involve trusting a third party; but unless you're buying drugs, assassinations, etc. that's not a big deal,” tweeted Krugman.
First all of all, there’s no reason to bring morals into an exploration of bitcoin’s utility. Either people will use it or they won’t. Whether you like what they’re doing is a different matter. Bitcoin’s use in darknet markets, ransomware, online gambling and other fringe areas cannot be ignored. Utility is utility.
Secondly, not everyone has access to PayPal, Venmo, and other online payment platforms. These options are centralized and permissioned. They’re also highly regulated, which means plenty of people fall through the cracks and cannot gain access to them.
Online freelancers in Venezuela take bitcoin because their government and payment platforms like PayPal have failed them.
Krugman goes on to point out the clunkiness of Bitcoin as it exists today, and he’s generally correct on this front. But this does not mean there’s no utility here. In fact, the opposite is true: There is so much utility that it has become difficult to scale the system to all of the people who want to use it.
Complaining about the lack of cheap, user-friendly payments on Bitcoin today is analogous to someone in 1995 complaining that the internet doesn’t have Netflix. Just give it a minute. Payment layers are currently being built on top of the base Bitcoin blockchain, with the Lightning Network being the most obvious example. The Claim That Bitcoin Has Nothing to Backstop Its Value
Krugman then turned to the often-used argument that bitcoin lacks any sort of underlying value. This should come as a surprise, since he just laid out how it is useful for illicit digital payments.
“Meanwhile, what backstops a cryptocurrency's value? Paper money is ultimately backed by governments that will take it in payment of taxes (and central banks that will reduce the monetary base in case of inflation). Gold is actually useful for some things, like filling teeth and making pretty jewelry; that's not most of its value, but it does provide a tether to reality, along with a 5000-year history,” tweeted Krugman.
“Cryptocurrencies have none of that,” Krugman continued. “If people come to believe that Bitcoin is worthless, well, it's worthless. Its price rise has been driven purely by speculation — by what Robert Shiller calls a natural Ponzi scheme, in which early entrants make money only [because] others buy in.”
If bitcoin is useful for permissionless digital payments, then it has the same sort of underlying utility that the U.S. dollar has in the form of tax payments.
Additionally, the U.S. dollar would also become worthless if people woke up one morning and came to believe that it was worthless.
Of course, all of this misses the point anyway. How much of the value of all the U.S. dollars in the world comes from its use in tax payments? How much of the value of all the gold in the world comes from its use in electronics? Not much.
Krugman misses that storage of value is also a form of utility, and bitcoin is the most uncensorable, unseizable store of value the world has ever seen. You can walk around with a passphrase in your head that can unlock access to thousands of bitcoins, and no one would be the wiser. Not to mention there is no centralized party that can inflate the supply. The Point of Market Manipulation
Krugman also touched on the high potential for manipulation in the bitcoin market, pointing to a paper regarding the manipulation of the bitcoin price by now-defunct bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox, as an example.
This is another claim with some basis in reality, but it ignores the massive amounts of manipulation and lack of transparency in the traditional financial system, which is what led to the creation of bitcoin in the first place.
Through the use of cryptographic proofs, bitcoin has the potential to become much more transparent and trustless than the traditional financial system. Bitcoin’s monetary policy is already much more transparent than what goes on at the Federal Reserve. There’s a reason someone put up a “Buy Bitcoin” sign while Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen spoke against the need for further audits of the central bank.
Bitcoin exchanges are highly centralized institutions, which opens the door for manipulation. However, these exchanges have also become much more regulated over time. Today, it’s far more difficult to run an exchange at the level of incompetence that was found at Mt. Gox.
The potential for market manipulation should decline as the technology around bitcoin improves. Eventually, more trades may take place on decentralized exchanges, where it’s impossible to fudge the numbers.
In his last tweet from his thread on Sunday, Krugman said it’s unclear if the Bitcoin blockchain — or any blockchain for that matter — is useful.
Around $3 billion worth of bitcoin has been transacted on the Bitcoin network per day this year, according to Blockchain; $75 million worth of bitcoin per day was the norm the day Krugman first published an article on the subject.
Krugman’s arguments, as well as arguments from other well-known economists, have not changed much since 2013, but the Bitcoin network has continued to grow. It’s possible that Krugman and his colleagues are unable to comprehend the usefulness of bitcoin as an asset because it does not fit into the regulated, controlled environment they’ve built their economic and political worldviews around.
Bitcoin cannot be tamed, and they hate that.
submitted by CryptoWorld3 to u/CryptoWorld3 [link] [comments]

Not an influencer according to Coindesk ?

Wow !
I wrote to the Uniform Law Commission to let them know that that their proposed regulation regulation was shit ! yet the ULC is on the list.
I am in the continuous process of suing the New York State government over the bitlicense and the New York Daily News says: "New York Daily News: Man at center of bitcoin-bodega lawsuit wants Paul Krugman to testify.
All the stories are here: https://www.article78againstnydfs.com/press.php
Yes, I guess, I am trying to influence that bitcoin is an Intangible Commodity
And check out the guy in jail: https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreeMorpheusTitania December 12, 2017 in Phoenix, Arizona.
submitted by theochino to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoins Come to China

By Chen Huijing (陈慧晶) Issue 618, May 6, 2013 Market, page 17 Translated by Zhu Na Original article: [Chinese] http://www.eeo.com.cn/ens/2013/0509/243777.shtml
Within just one month, the value Cheng Hua’s (程华) Bitcoin holdings had increased nearly sixfold.
Bitcoin, an unofficial virtual currency that’s transferred digitally without an intermediate financial institution, saw its value soar from $46 to $230 between Mar 10 and April 10.
Cheng Hua was one of the first Chinese to trade the currency. In China, Bitcoin lovers like him call themselves “BTCers.”
Li Xiaolai (李笑来), who claims to have the largest collection of Bitcoins in China, describes his obsession saying, “Bitcoin is the most stunning and most subversive social experiment in history.”
Will Bitcoin start to challenge traditional currency? Or is this just a speculative bubble that will become the digital world’s “Tulip Mania”?
A Crisis and an Opportunity
If it weren’t for the banking crisis that hit Cyprus, Cheng Hua may have totally forgotten about the 2,000 Bitcoins that he and his friends bought two years ago.
On Mar 16, the Mediterranean island nation of about 1 million signed on for a 10 billion euro bailout from the EU and IMF. As part of the deal, Cyprus would raise 5.8 billion euro by levying a one-off 6.7 percent tax on bank deposits under 100,000 euro and 9.9 percent on higher deposits. Once the news circulated, people in Cyprus rushed to withdraw their money from banks.
During this time, downloads of online software for trading Bitcoin started to boom. Cypriots were very interested in a virtual currency with no central government control.
Jeff Berwick, founder of StockHouse.com and CEO of TDV Media, announced that he planned to open a Bitcoin ATM in Cyprus. He said that within just a few days, he received many orders for these special ATMs.
With the surge in demand, the price of Bitcoin against the U.S. dollar soared. On Mar 16, it was worth $47. By Apr 9, it broke through $200 and reached its highest point of $230. But it soon fell back to around $100.
“During this month of watching Bitcoin, I hardly got any sleep,” said a “BTCer” who just recently got interested in the field. “Between the time I closed my eyes and opened them again, the price had risen or dropped more than $10. It was very exciting.”
He’s considering selling his house so he can invest all his money in Bitcoin.
Cheng Hua was also shocked by the recent events. He found that the 5,000 yuan he invested in Bitcoin two years ago was now worth 40 times that amount.
Investment
Bitcoin was started in 2008 by an anonymous creator as an alternative to government controlled currency - much like gold. And like gold, Bitcoin is “mined” virtually. According to Wall Street Journal, people can mine Bitcoins with computers and special software by solving complicated mathematical problems. But since the process is so difficult, most just opt to buy it. New Bitcoins are made available to be mined when the network is updated, and the amount of new coins distributed will be halved every year until 2140 when the total number will be capped at 21 million.
In May 2011, Cheng Hua and his colleagues at a software company started to mine Bitcoin online. “At that time there weren’t many people mining, so it was easy,” he said. “In the beginning, we could dig up two or three Bitcoins per day. There were different mines as well as rankings. We joined one of them, and coins were allocated based on the contribution of miners’ calculation ability.”
Like many Bitcoin lovers, Cheng Hua and his team’s mining experience wasn’t very successful. The money they generated from selling Bitcoins was less than what they’d invested in the electronic infrastructure to mine. After half a year, they gave up. Luckily for Cheng, he held on to many of the coins.
Li Xiaolai (李笑来), founder of a major website, invested hundreds of thousands of yuan and suffered major losses, but persisted in the Bitcoin market. He continued to gain more by buying low and selling high. “In the end, I gained 2,100 Bitcoins using this method, which was far beyond my expectations,” Li said.
He says that Bitcoin is valuable because it ensures inviolability of private property through its decentralized peer-to-peer structure. To him, it provides a guarantee of freedom.
The Future Economy?
Bitcoin has come a long way in its short history. As of Mar 30, all Bitcoins that have been issued so far were together worth over $1 billion. And a series of Bitcoin-related industries have developed including Bitcoin exchanges, information websites and third-party payment services.
In the U.S., Bitcoin is already being used in daily life. According to an October 2012 report by BitPay, a company providing payment mediums for Bitcoin, over 1,000 merchants accepted payment with the currency through their system.
Though Bitcoin just started to take off in China this year, there are already more than 10 online stores on Taobao that accept the currency. And after the Ya’an earthquake hit, Bitcoin donations were accepted.
American economist Paul Krugman has come down hard on Bitcoins, saying they “derive their value, if any, purely from self-fulfilling prophecy, the belief that other people will accept them as payment.”
“BTCers” have a different view. Li says that Bitcoin does indeed have some shortcomings currently, but that’s because people dealing with the young currency have a mindset that’s accumulated after thousands of years of using traditional money. Volatility, he says, is natural in the beginning.
“I don’t see Bitcoin as speculation or an investment,” Li said. “For me, it’s a social practice. Gold doesn’t support currency. People’s trust supports currency. Bitcoin is the same. It has no intrinsic value. It’s gained trust from people on the internet voluntarily. This trust is more valuable than the forced trust traditional currency relies on.”
Cheng Hua holds the same view “Bitcoin is based on the principle of trust,” he says. “Maybe it will have bubble stages, but currency must go through these stages during development. The traditional legal currency also went through these stages in its emergence. The future economy in the virtual world is built on the basis of virtual currency. This is the value of Bitcoin.”
submitted by aisen to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: Economics top posts from 2016-12-11 to 2017-12-10 14:09 PDT

Period: 363.96 days
Submissions Comments
Total 998 124701
Rate (per day) 2.74 341.28
Unique Redditors 447 16507
Combined Score 499738 904919

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 24425 points, 17 submissions: speckz
    1. At $75,560, housing a prisoner in California now costs more than a year at Harvard (5125 points, 597 comments)
    2. America’s Lost Einsteins - Millions of children from poor families who excel in math and science rarely live up to their potential—and that hurts everyone. (3231 points, 440 comments)
    3. One in five American households have ‘zero or negative’ wealth (2951 points, 619 comments)
    4. Escaping Poverty Requires Almost 20 Years With Nearly Nothing Going Wrong. The MIT economist Peter Temin argues that economic inequality results in two distinct classes. And only one of them has any power. (2717 points, 631 comments)
    5. After decades of pushing bachelor’s degrees, U.S. needs more tradespeople (2386 points, 587 comments)
    6. The world’s most valuable resource is no longer oil, but data (2200 points, 198 comments)
    7. Employees Who Stay In Companies Longer Than Two Years Get Paid 50% Less (1873 points, 260 comments)
    8. Student Loan Debt Is Now As Big as the U.S. Junk Market (1392 points, 380 comments)
    9. The tech sector is leaving the rest of the US economy in its dust (614 points, 235 comments)
    10. The Countries Most (and Least) Likely to be Affected by Automation. Japan is at the top with 55.7% while the US is at 45.8%. (532 points, 138 comments)
  2. 19191 points, 26 submissions: jimrosenz
    1. Warren Buffett wins $1M bet made a decade ago that the S&P 500 stock index would outperform hedge funds (7205 points, 402 comments)
    2. The Gender Pay Gap Is Largely Because of Motherhood (3325 points, 661 comments)
    3. 'Negligible' link between executive pay and firm's performance, says study (1561 points, 165 comments)
    4. We need to challenge the myth that the rich are specially-talented wealth creators (1231 points, 552 comments)
    5. Will MySpace ever lose its monopoly? (2007) (1219 points, 193 comments)
    6. Should the Government Bring Back Trust-Busting? (1093 points, 201 comments)
    7. Economics isn't a bogus science — we just don't use it correctly (625 points, 176 comments)
    8. ‘Exclusionary zoning’ is opportunity hoarding by upper middle class (559 points, 240 comments)
    9. Index Funds Are Great for Investors, Risky for Corporate Governance (358 points, 75 comments)
    10. Milton Friedman's Cherished Theory Is Laid to Rest (324 points, 156 comments)
  3. 15893 points, 26 submissions: ghostofpennwast
    1. Student Debt Is a Major Reason Millennials Aren't Buying Homes (2228 points, 487 comments)
    2. Americans Are Paying $38 to Collect $1 of Student Debt (1598 points, 150 comments)
    3. Report: America’s marijuana industry headed for $24 billion by 2025 (1350 points, 74 comments)
    4. Solar Power Will Kill Coal Faster Than You Think (1336 points, 243 comments)
    5. Saudi Arabia signals end of tax-free living as oil revenues slump (1013 points, 264 comments)
    6. One-third of Americans say they’d have trouble coming up with an emergency $2,000 (979 points, 346 comments)
    7. Trump Seeks $3.6 Trillion in Spending Cuts to Reshape Government (977 points, 652 comments)
    8. Indian American community richest with median household income of $103,821 (846 points, 201 comments)
    9. Foreigners snap up record number of US homes (825 points, 363 comments)
    10. More Americans Are Falling Behind on Student Loans, and Nobody Quite Knows Why (679 points, 526 comments)
  4. 13354 points, 31 submissions: Splenda
    1. Study: The richest families in Florence in 1427 are still the richest families in Florence (5678 points, 501 comments)
    2. Handing Out Tax Breaks to Businesses Is Worse Than Useless: Study exposes the futility of the $45 billion that states spend on economic development incentives. (1410 points, 120 comments)
    3. The Never-Ending Foreclosure: How can the country survive the next economic crash if millions of families still haven't recovered from the last one? (1061 points, 331 comments)
    4. Memo To Steven Mnuchin: Trump's Tax Plan Would Add $7 Trillion To The Debt Over 10 Years (950 points, 317 comments)
    5. Rural America Is Aging and Shrinking (414 points, 364 comments)
    6. This Is What a Real Middle-Class Tax Cut Would Look Like (387 points, 252 comments)
    7. The coming battle between the Trump team and economists over the true cost of climate change (290 points, 102 comments)
    8. Here’s One Scary Way Trump’s Team Could Manipulate Government Data: It has plans to recalculate the social cost of carbon, which has been called “the most important number you’ve never heard of.” (256 points, 29 comments)
    9. Hot and Violent: Researchers have begun to understand the economic and social damage caused by climate change. (238 points, 90 comments)
    10. How Wall Street Once Killed the U.S. Solar Industry… and how it could happen again. (238 points, 53 comments)
  5. 12703 points, 31 submissions: DoremusJessup
    1. U.S. Wage Disparity Took Another Turn for the Worse Last Year: The rich-poor pay gap is getting wider (1307 points, 323 comments)
    2. European Union finance ministers agreed on Tuesday to close loopholes multinational corporations use to skip taxation on dividends, part of a drive to stop them from parking profits where they pay the least tax (1063 points, 131 comments)
    3. Trump Plan to Slash LLC Rate Is Boon for Top Earners: Cutting pass-through rate to 15% could cost $2 trillion; Top 1% would get tax cut of $76,000 - Tax Policy Center (1046 points, 216 comments)
    4. Robots Are Slashing U.S. Wages and Worsening Pay Inequality: Robots have a real impact on jobs and wages, new research shows (1014 points, 391 comments)
    5. US Adds 156K Jobs; Unemployment Rate Ticks up to 4.7 Pct. Hourly pay jumped 2.9 percent from a year earlier, the biggest increase in more than seven years (883 points, 350 comments)
    6. Norway's sovereign wealth fund, the world's largest, on Friday called for a cap on executive pay and fiscal transparency at the companies in which it invests, further buffing its reputation as an ethical investor (846 points, 78 comments)
    7. U.S. payrolls increase more than expected, wages rise (842 points, 142 comments)
    8. America’s Biggest Creditors Dump Treasuries in Warning to Trump (838 points, 309 comments)
    9. Unemployment in the U.S. Is Falling, So Why Isn’t Pay Rising? (571 points, 228 comments)
    10. Citigroup on Thursday became the first-ever bank to get hit with civil "spoofing charges," after U.S. derivatives regulators said one of its units entered U.S. Treasury futures market orders with the intent of canceling them (511 points, 46 comments)
  6. 12274 points, 1 submission: CADBP
    1. Freakonomics: You're twice as likely to go from low to high income in Canada than in the USA (12274 points, 809 comments)
  7. 11930 points, 4 submissions: trot-trot
    1. Trade school, not 4-year college, is a better bet to solve the US income gap, researchers say (11060 points, 1329 comments)
    2. Libor: Bank of England implicated in secret recording (517 points, 9 comments)
    3. 'These Boots are Made for Walking': Why Most Divorce Filers are Women (273 points, 268 comments)
    4. This Is Le Pen's Plan to Break Up the Euro (80 points, 11 comments)
  8. 11267 points, 16 submissions: unimployed
    1. Basically every problem in the US economy is because companies have too much power, new research argues (7086 points, 372 comments)
    2. The Fraternity Paradox: Lower GPA, Higher Incomes (1440 points, 319 comments)
    3. The Real Reason the U.S. Has Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance (566 points, 95 comments)
    4. US opioid crisis holds back jobs market recovery, says study (563 points, 74 comments)
    5. An important shift in the job market makes the mystery of weak wage growth less puzzling (345 points, 62 comments)
    6. The Economics and Politics Of Flooding and Insurance (266 points, 56 comments)
    7. Economic models are broken, and economists have wildly different ideas about how to fix them (198 points, 130 comments)
    8. Most Americans live paycheck to paycheck (128 points, 56 comments)
    9. Trump preparing withdrawal from South Korea trade deal (97 points, 46 comments)
    10. The Incredible Shrinking Corporate Tax Bill (93 points, 24 comments)
  9. 9635 points, 17 submissions: lingben
    1. I’m a Depression historian. The GOP tax bill is straight out of 1929 (2907 points, 577 comments)
    2. 35 of 37 economists said Trump was wrong. The other two misread the question. (2127 points, 198 comments)
    3. CEOs agree: Corporate tax cuts won't trickle down (738 points, 301 comments)
    4. Trump's Numbers Guy Isn't Great With Numbers (662 points, 111 comments)
    5. Trumponomics Gets The Thumbs Down From Nobel-Winning Economists (563 points, 268 comments)
    6. If Everyone Is So Confident, Why Aren’t They Borrowing? (466 points, 179 comments)
    7. Economists Have No Use for Republican Tax Cuts (447 points, 180 comments)
    8. Corruption Is Still a Problem Ten Months After India's Cash Ban (412 points, 39 comments)
    9. Should the rich be taxed more? (352 points, 554 comments)
    10. Trump Administration Considers Change in Calculating U.S. Trade Deficit (208 points, 19 comments)
  10. 9371 points, 1 submission: RegressToTheMean
    1. Poll: Economists Unanimous That Debt Would Balloon Under GOP Tax Plan (9371 points, 848 comments)
  11. 8887 points, 39 submissions: mberre
    1. Japan logs longest phase of growth in 16 years (846 points, 76 comments)
    2. British Employers Begin To See A Pre-Brexit Exit Of Foreign Workers (746 points, 268 comments)
    3. US unemployment falls to 10-year low (602 points, 228 comments)
    4. U.S. new home sales fall to seven-month low (546 points, 242 comments)
    5. US deficit rises to 2008 levels (538 points, 91 comments)
    6. Iceland to end capital controls from 2008 financial crisis - BBC News (463 points, 48 comments)
    7. Swiss say goodbye to banking secrecy (450 points, 122 comments)
    8. Pew Research: In a Recovering Market, Homeownership Rates Are Down Sharply for Blacks, Young Adults (439 points, 183 comments)
    9. UK wealth gap 'widening over past decade' says report - BBC News (429 points, 182 comments)
    10. Fed's Williams calls for global rethink of monetary policy (387 points, 158 comments)
  12. 7956 points, 6 submissions: johnmountain
    1. Martin Schulz to Trump: Dropping Paris agreement means no trade talks -- ‘Whoever wants to have access to our market needs to respect the European standards,’ Schulz says. (6708 points, 1020 comments)
    2. Paul Krugman in 1998: Internet’s Economic Impact No Greater Than Fax Machine (710 points, 261 comments)
    3. Without Power to Run A.T.M.s, Puerto Rico Is Cash Only (210 points, 15 comments)
    4. A basic income could boost the US economy by $2.5 trillion (150 points, 165 comments)
    5. America's housing inventory crisis is causing home prices to rise at double the rate of a 'normal' market (91 points, 15 comments)
    6. Why Do Cities Become Unaffordable? (87 points, 117 comments)
  13. 6952 points, 2 submissions: mjanes
    1. The U.S. Has Forgotten How to Do Infrastructure: The nation once built things fast and cheaply. Now experts are puzzled why costs are higher and projects take longer than in other countries. (5056 points, 575 comments)
    2. Reaganomics killed America’s middle class (1896 points, 468 comments)
  14. 6290 points, 2 submissions: Nolagamer
    1. 37 of 38 economists said the GOP tax plans would grow the debt. The 38th misread the question. (5268 points, 473 comments)
    2. Opioid crisis: Nearly half of working-age American men who are out of the labor force are using painkillers daily (1022 points, 137 comments)
  15. 5852 points, 7 submissions: PinkSlimeIsPeople
    1. Tax Cuts Don't Lead to Economic Growth, a New 65-Year Study Finds (3816 points, 352 comments)
    2. You're not imagining it: the rich really are hoarding economic growth (841 points, 546 comments)
    3. Vast Majority of Americans Would Likely Lose From Senate GOP’s $1.5 Trillion in Tax Cuts, Once They’re Paid For (347 points, 128 comments)
    4. Commentary: Signs Suggest Trump Budget Will Feature Unprecedented Cuts Plus Large Tax Cuts Favoring Wealthy (323 points, 212 comments)
    5. Eight Market-Oriented Proposals That Reduce Income Inequality (304 points, 280 comments)
    6. Republicans’ tax plan gives the top 1 percent of households a $207,000 tax cut; Bottom 20 percent get $50 (163 points, 154 comments)
    7. Eliminating Two ACA Medicare Taxes Means Huge Tax Cuts for High Earners and the Wealthy (58 points, 67 comments)
  16. 5489 points, 10 submissions: pipsdontsqueak
    1. Americans want U.S. goods, but not willing to pay more: Reuters/Ipsos poll (1219 points, 461 comments)
    2. After a Tax Crackdown, Apple Found a New Shelter for Its Profits (1216 points, 221 comments)
    3. Fed raises rates for third time since the recession (716 points, 170 comments)
    4. U.S. moves to impose tariffs of as much as 219 percent on Canadian jet maker, siding with Boeing (672 points, 120 comments)
    5. Bitcoin hits all-time high after CME Group says to launch futures (637 points, 365 comments)
    6. Trump Is Expected to Name Jerome Powell as Next Fed Chairman (451 points, 58 comments)
    7. Awaiting Trump's coal comeback, miners reject retraining (202 points, 118 comments)
    8. Republicans to propose keeping top tax rate for very wealthy, nodding to concerns (202 points, 63 comments)
    9. Experian fined $3M over 'inaccurate' credit scores (97 points, 3 comments)
    10. Paradise Papers: Apple's secret tax bolthole revealed (77 points, 8 comments)
  17. 5133 points, 2 submissions: MaxGhenis
    1. Something missing from Trump's Cabinet: Economists (4128 points, 575 comments)
    2. San Francisco Bans Salary History Questions (1005 points, 243 comments)
  18. 4744 points, 16 submissions: InvisibleTextArea
    1. New Zealand bans foreign home buyers (1744 points, 533 comments)
    2. EU Audit Admits Greek Bailouts Didn't Go as Planned (811 points, 291 comments)
    3. Renters in the UK spend average of 62 per cent of income on rent (627 points, 104 comments)
    4. Venezuela pulls most common banknote from circulation to 'beat mafia' (369 points, 80 comments)
    5. Yet again, today’s politicians are ignoring basic economics (166 points, 111 comments)
    6. The next crash risk is hiding in plain sight (159 points, 36 comments)
    7. After Universal Basic Income, The Flood (143 points, 118 comments)
    8. Slow economic growth is not the new normal, it's the old norm (124 points, 117 comments)
    9. Cryptoeconomics 101 (88 points, 9 comments)
    10. Of productivity in France and in Germany (85 points, 19 comments)
  19. 4258 points, 16 submissions: kludgeocracy
    1. How Corporations and the Wealthy Avoid Taxes (and How to Stop Them) (787 points, 296 comments)
    2. How “Shareholder Value” is Killing Innovation (637 points, 217 comments)
    3. Capitalism Can Thrive Without Cooking the Planet (547 points, 296 comments)
    4. American builders’ productivity has plunged by half since the late 1960s (519 points, 112 comments)
    5. There's a $136,400 reason so many Americans feel they haven't made economic progress (470 points, 186 comments)
    6. What Happened When 18 States Raised Their Minimum Wage? (242 points, 189 comments)
    7. Democrats just united on a $15-an-hour minimum wage (208 points, 252 comments)
    8. Avoiding Payday Loans Makes the Poor Richer (201 points, 44 comments)
    9. Maybe We’ve Been Thinking About the Productivity Slump All Wrong (167 points, 92 comments)
    10. Researchers have answered a big question about the decline of the middle class (95 points, 50 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. tcoop6231 (6607 points, 678 comments)
  2. SmokingPuffin (5048 points, 544 comments)
  3. MasterBerter (4931 points, 369 comments)
  4. louieanderson (4560 points, 710 comments)
  5. autotldr (3551 points, 333 comments)
  6. TitaniumDragon (3202 points, 693 comments)
  7. Adam_df (3193 points, 611 comments)
  8. HTownian25 (3165 points, 392 comments)
  9. slash196 (3002 points, 284 comments)
  10. thewimsey (2932 points, 534 comments)
  11. MELBOT87 (2835 points, 187 comments)
  12. HeFlipYa (2819 points, 380 comments)
  13. Ponderay (2809 points, 198 comments)
  14. Mylon (2732 points, 510 comments)
  15. ucstruct (2729 points, 241 comments)
  16. bartink (2473 points, 645 comments)
  17. throwittomebro (2360 points, 490 comments)
  18. holy_rollers (2318 points, 211 comments)
  19. Lando_Calrissian (2314 points, 14 comments)
  20. bokabo (2250 points, 487 comments)
  21. skatastic57 (2212 points, 284 comments)
  22. bobmarles3 (2179 points, 189 comments)
  23. Splenda (2159 points, 366 comments)
  24. mwatwe01 (2133 points, 34 comments)
  25. UpsideVII (2120 points, 171 comments)
  26. sunflowerfly (2032 points, 178 comments)
  27. OliverSparrow (2002 points, 362 comments)
  28. Rookwood (1965 points, 297 comments)
  29. besttrousers (1948 points, 181 comments)
  30. sethstorm (1928 points, 880 comments)
  31. roboczar (1899 points, 133 comments)
  32. HumanKapital_ (1889 points, 404 comments)
  33. itsreaditpeople (1887 points, 13 comments)
  34. cd411 (1880 points, 62 comments)
  35. brberg (1841 points, 287 comments)
  36. Brad_Wesley (1811 points, 183 comments)
  37. DrSandbags (1772 points, 164 comments)
  38. DefendedCobra29 (1727 points, 27 comments)
  39. Uptons_BJs (1660 points, 70 comments)
  40. TracyMorganFreeman (1655 points, 628 comments)
  41. whyrat (1652 points, 110 comments)
  42. FweeSpeech (1648 points, 68 comments)
  43. darwin2500 (1635 points, 229 comments)
  44. Holophonist (1612 points, 247 comments)
  45. Nolagamer (1569 points, 272 comments)
  46. Dave1mo1 (1553 points, 171 comments)
  47. WordSalad11 (1546 points, 167 comments)
  48. HeTalksToComputers (1511 points, 141 comments)
  49. number676766 (1475 points, 7 comments)
  50. matty_a (1445 points, 1 comment)

Top Submissions

  1. Freakonomics: You're twice as likely to go from low to high income in Canada than in the USA by CADBP (12274 points, 809 comments)
  2. Trade school, not 4-year college, is a better bet to solve the US income gap, researchers say by trot-trot (11060 points, 1329 comments)
  3. Poll: Economists Unanimous That Debt Would Balloon Under GOP Tax Plan by RegressToTheMean (9371 points, 848 comments)
  4. Warren Buffett wins $1M bet made a decade ago that the S&P 500 stock index would outperform hedge funds by jimrosenz (7205 points, 402 comments)
  5. Basically every problem in the US economy is because companies have too much power, new research argues by unimployed (7086 points, 372 comments)
  6. Martin Schulz to Trump: Dropping Paris agreement means no trade talks -- ‘Whoever wants to have access to our market needs to respect the European standards,’ Schulz says. by johnmountain (6708 points, 1020 comments)
  7. Study: The richest families in Florence in 1427 are still the richest families in Florence by Splenda (5678 points, 501 comments)
  8. Warren Buffett declared victory Saturday in his decade-long, $1 million bet that low-cost index funds would out earn more expensive hedge funds by deleted (5318 points, 311 comments)
  9. 37 of 38 economists said the GOP tax plans would grow the debt. The 38th misread the question. by Nolagamer (5268 points, 473 comments)
  10. At $75,560, housing a prisoner in California now costs more than a year at Harvard by speckz (5125 points, 597 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 1760 points: itsreaditpeople's comment in Freakonomics: You're twice as likely to go from low to high income in Canada than in the USA
  2. 1678 points: mwatwe01's comment in Trade school, not 4-year college, is a better bet to solve the US income gap, researchers say
  3. 1445 points: matty_a's comment in Trump Administration Rolls Back Protections for People in Default on Student Loans
  4. 1411 points: electrik_wizard's comment in The U.S. Has Forgotten How to Do Infrastructure: The nation once built things fast and cheaply. Now experts are puzzled why costs are higher and projects take longer than in other countries.
  5. 1326 points: number676766's comment in Something missing from Trump's Cabinet: Economists
  6. 1314 points: Lando_Calrissian's comment in Trump names Japan a currency manipulator
  7. 1201 points: DefendedCobra29's comment in Poll: Economists Unanimous That Debt Would Balloon Under GOP Tax Plan
  8. 1004 points: kristopolous's comment in Reaganomics killed America’s middle class
  9. 1000 points: TheWhitestOrca's comment in Poll: Economists Unanimous That Debt Would Balloon Under GOP Tax Plan
  10. 983 points: BmoreIntelligent's comment in The Fraternity Paradox: Lower GPA, Higher Incomes
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BREAKING NEWS! U.S. Marshals SEIZE Bitcoin & AUCTION IT! China's E-Yuan to DESTROY the US Reserve. Paul Krugman Is Finally Right About Something: Government Violence Bitcoin is a Monolith Paul Krugman on Unions Bitcoin Hits $10,000 Once Again But Its Rally is Slowing ...

Paul Krugman Bitcoin Is Evil Search. Subscribe Now Log In 0 Settings. Close search Site Search Navigation. Search NYTimes.com. Clear this text input. Go. Loading... See next articles. See previous articles. Site Navigation Site Mobile Navigation. Supported by. Search. Bitcoin Is Evil . December 28, 2013 2:35 pm December 28, 2013 2:35 pm. It’s always important, and always hard, to ... Paul Krugman, a New York Times opinion columnist, writes about macroeconomics, trade, health care, social policy and politics. In 2008, he received the Nobel Prize in Economics. Paul Krugman, galardonado con el Premio Nobel de Economía en 2008, criticó nuevamente a Bitcoin en su última columna para el diario estadounidense The New York Times, afirmando que las ... Bitcoin Is A Bubble To be sure, this is not the first time that Krugman has come out against bitcoin. Back in December, when bitcoin prices were shooting to record highs, Krugman said that the ... Nobel prize-winning economist Paul Krugman talks to Business Insider senior political editor Josh Barro about bitcoin. Krugman says the price of bitcoin is helped by the fact that no one understands it and people are caught up in the mystique of this new technology. Following is a transcript of the video. Josh Barro: Finally, I want […]

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BREAKING NEWS! U.S. Marshals SEIZE Bitcoin & AUCTION IT! China's E-Yuan to DESTROY the US Reserve.

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